January 18, 2022 11:17 pm

Today’s latest culture news Saturday, December 4

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Be informed about the last hour of today it is essential to know the world around us. But, if you don’t have too much time, ABC makes available to those readers who want it, the best summary of the Saturday, December 4 right here:

Long drinks and short stories to reunite with Cervantes, Jane Austen and Aristophanes

Carolina During and Mujeres wanted a room and a hundred thousand glasses, Josele Santiago who would harm the water and not the liquor, and Gonzalo Torné Well, Gonzalo Torné (Barcelona, ​​1976) what he wants is to write in cafeterias surrounded by people (during confinement, he assures, his productivity came to a halt) and evoke centuries of traditional toasts, conversations that progress by making Eses between glasses, and characters born from the bottom of the bottle.

Long drinks in short format to make up for lost time and stolen hugs and bury under the weight of history, under the always imposing presence of Cervantes, Jane Austen, Rimbaud, Emilia Pardo Bazán, Aristófanes, Larra, Carson McCullers O Valle-Inclán, Among many others, almost two years of social distance, bubbles of coexistence and almost banned contact. “Over time we confined ourselves, we have been aware of the things we do in apparently non-cultural spaces such as a bar, a cafeteria or a winery”, explains Torné. “And if someone has a Marquis friend, we could also talk about palatial dining rooms,” he adds sarcastically.

Eslava Galán: «Women had very bad luck with Hitler»

The Ateneo de Madrid was the setting for the presentation of the latest book by Juan Eslava Galán, ‘Nazi Encyclopedia told for skeptics’ (Planet). The event, framed in the new activity ‘La caña del Ateneo’ that is held on Fridays, had the journalist Edu Galán as presenter. The two Galán brought to the most interesting terrain the author’s vast knowledge on this subject, which the book demonstrates.

Alvin Lucier: Essential Figure of Experimental Music

The American musician Alvin Lucier, noted for his study of the relationship between art and sound and their physical properties, has died at the age of ninety at his home in Connecticut due to complications arising from a fall. Born in New Hampshire in 1931, he received musical training at Yale and then Brandeis universities, before heading to Rome on a Fulbright scholarship, where he studied with Aaron Copland and Lukas Foss combining a neoclassical style with avant-garde works by Luigi Nono, Pierre Boulez and Karlheinz Stockhausen, and later diversifying his concerns after seeing a concert by John Cage, David Tudor and Merce Cunningham in 1960, which prompted him to experiment with technology in his creative processes. He used brain sensors, echolocation devices and other tools to generate sounds, studying sound waves and their development in space, becoming a benchmark for the most avant-garde experimental music. In 1966 he became a member of the Sonic Arts Union alongside composers such as David Behrman, Robert Ashley, and Gordon Mumma.

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